Competition for jobs exists everywhere, but even more so here in this hub of elite, ambitious Walmart and supplier executives who make up Vendorville. If you're a job seeker in Northwest Arkansas, you'll have to be aggressive and intentional. Simply submitting your resume online won't cut it.


Walmart Community Job Search Tips: Get Noticed - 3 Top Strategies Beyond the Resume

by Angela Forsyth


Competition for jobs exists everywhere, but even more so here in this hub of elite, ambitious Walmart and supplier executives who make up Vendorville. If you're a job seeker in Northwest Arkansas, you'll have to be aggressive and intentional. Simply submitting your resume online won't cut it.


Once your resume has been updated and carefully edited, consider the following tips to make sure you get noticed and you get that interview.


Use LinkedIn to your Advantage

What you may not know - especially if it's been years since you looked for a job - is the importance of LinkedIn. Shelby McGuire Canlas, coaching team lead for IMPACT Group - leader in relocation support - regularly tells her clients to begin their job search by beefing up their LinkedIn profile. "LinkedIn is an important tool because it allows you to find and be found," she notes. McGuire recommends increasing your online searchability by taking the keywords you consistently find in targeted job postings and working them into your profile. This means when an employer searches for candidates on LinkedIn and types in those keywords, your profile will be more likely to pop up. "Additionally, LinkedIn is a tremendous research tool." McGuire says. "You can use it to identify companies of interest, read up on your interviewers, stay on top of industry trends, and many other things that are important components of an effective job search."


Remember, this networking site is your online footprint. If a hiring manager is interested in you, chances are one of his first steps will be to look you up on LinkedIn. Include a professional-looking profile picture. Statistics show that people who have a photo on LinkedIn are 7 times more likely to have their profiles viewed than those who don't.


Send your Resume to a Decision-maker

Sending out your resume boils down to a simple case of quality vs. quantity. According to Cameron Smith, founder of Cameron Smith & Associates, many job seekers make the mistake of firing off a bunch of resumes to a long list of companies. To get your resume in the right hands, you have to be more strategic.


Let's say you're interested in a sales analyst position at Mattel. If you simply send your resume to HR and wait, you probably won't hear anything back. Instead, go on LinkedIn, research the name and email address of the Mattel VP. If the information isn't available on LinkedIn, go online to your network of friends and colleagues, and ask them if they know anyone who works there. Chances are you know someone who knows somebody at that company and can give you the information you need.


When you email your resume to the VP, Smith recommends copying HR. "Once HR sees you sent your resume to the VP, HR will say 'hey, I'd better hang onto this; he's a serious candidate,'" he notes. "Don't just give it to the person who can say no, but can't say yes. Get the resume in the hands of a decision-maker."


Sway the Employer with your Email

A company's website can offer a surprising level of insider information as to what values are important to them and what that company would like to hear from you. Smith suggests pulling important phrases or characteristics from the employer's website and intertwining them into the body of your email. For example, if you notice they mention energy and ethics, these are two principles that are important in their company culture. Find a way to describe yourself with these terms.


This is your opportunity to point out anything that is important to them, but isn't on your resume. Be concise; busy employers will appreciate that. Don't try to offer things that are irrelevant to the job, such as being an eagle scout.


As you write your initial email, err on the side of formality; for example, "Dear Mr. Richardson." Once you receive a response, you can follow the lead of the employer's tone.



Angela Forsyth, free lance writer with Firefly Marketing, LLC

Angela Forsyth, Freelance writer with Firefly Marketing, LLC